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Use of a Subcutaneous Ureteral Bypass Device

Use of a Subcutaneous Ureteral Bypass Device

A 9-month-old male domestic longhair cat presented following iatrogenic ureteral trauma after an attempted laparoscopic ovariectomy. Both ureters were transected approximately 4 mm from the renal pelves. Initial management involved a left-sided Boari flap neoureterocystostomy, cystonephropexy and right ureteronephrectomy. Thirty-six hours later, the cat developed uroabdomen due to leakage from the neoureterocystostomy site. The ureter was reconstructed via end-to-end anastomosis and a left-sided subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device was placed in the event the anastomosis failed. Five weeks after SUB placement, the cat was dysuric and stranguric. A urine culture was negative and clinical signs were attributed to sterile cystitis secondary to device placement. Contrast pyelography confirmed device patency, but no contrast was identified through the ureteral anastomosis. At 12 months, BUN and creatinine were 1.5 mg/dl and 25 mg/dl, respectively, and a subclinical urinary tract infection was identified (Enterococcus faecalis). At 42 months, BUN was 38 mg/dl and creatinine was 2.0 mg/dl. The cat had occasional and intermittent signs of pollakiuria and stranguria but was otherwise doing well.

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Use of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass device for treatment of bilateral proximal ureteral injury in a 9-month-old cat

 

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