Hi.

Welcome to my blog. I document my adventures in travel, style, and food. Hope you have a nice stay!

Is your kid a sore loser?

Is your kid a sore loser?

Ask any parent what it's like to play a board game with their children, and you'll get mixed answers. Some parents will laud the educational benefits of the game and bringing family together, and some will frankly say board games with the kids is something to be dreaded.If your child is constantly throwing tantrums when they lose, refusing to play if they're behind, or jeering and mockingothers when they win, family fun time isn't so fun for everyone. Kids who are poor sports may find it harder to enjoy playing with others, or even getting other kids to want to play with them at all. If your kid is struggling to figure out appropriate behavior when it comes down to competition, here are three ways you can help.

Don't let your child winIt's no secret that when you know exactly what kind of reaction you can expect from your child from losing, you don't try your hardest to win. Never winning a game ever against your child robs them of the chance to learn appropriate losing skills without the pressure from peers thrown into the mix.While there's no need to destroy them each and every game, making it clear that they aren't going to win everytime can help your child both to have appropriate expectations, and also learn how to accept losing graciously.

Keep PracticingWhen your kid is a sore loser, no on wants to play with them. Ever. Unfortunately, while this does reduce the number of times they can be a sore loser, it also reduces the chances they have to practice appropriate behavior. Play games where winning and losing are a possibility, including board games and even sports. When you win or lose, model the appropriate behavior you want to see in them, such as a hand shake or a comment like, “Good Game.” If you win, don't rub it in, but say the same thing. Bring the focus back on what's most important—the fun that was had while playing.

Talk about the behaviorIf your child continues to be a sore loser, talk about the problem when both of you are calm. Point out the poor behavior you saw, such as teasing another player or throwing themselves on the ground when they lost a match. Ask them why they did these things, and explain the correct behavior.How a child handles winning or losing can have a future impact on them as an adult. An adult who is a sore loser won't get the same enjoyment out of games as people who handle losing well, and if they take the same approach to 'winning' and 'losing' at their job, they may find it harder to be liked and promoted in the work place as well.Nobody likes a sore loser, so teaching your child how to handle losing well should be a life skill for the benefit of everyone.

Read more by clicking on the link below:

Prevent your child from being a sore loser

Surrey bikes: A unique way to exercise with family

Surrey bikes: A unique way to exercise with family

Supplements guys should be very cautious of

Supplements guys should be very cautious of